Setting up the Confidence Power Plus Treadmill for a Desk

This page primarily shows how to disable that annoying beeping sound on the Confidence Power Plus Motorized Electric Treadmill and will give you the dimensions for the “de-barred” version of the treadmill. For a more in depth review of the treadmill’s functionality, including the benefits and disadvantages of using this for a treadmill desk, see THIS PAGE (Near the bottom of the post).

Anyways, I got my Confidence Power Plus Motorized Electric Treadmill and pulled it out of the box. The box was a bit beat up (with holes so that people could grab onto it), but the treadmill itself was pretty well packed, so I didn’t suspect there was any damage. At the time of this writing, the cost was relatively cheap for a treadmill at $250, I think it’s currently around $200. 

Confidence Power Plus treadmill right out of the box

Confidence Power Plus treadmill right out of the box

First thing I needed to do is remove those pesky arms since they would get in the way if I placed it under a desk. (Keep in mind that this probably voids the warranty.) I inspected the attachment points of the arms to the treadmill to see what I would need to do to remove the arms and separate the control panel.

Treadmill arms attachment point

Treadmill arms attachment point

It pretty much looked like one bolt on either side needed to be removed. So I went ahead and did that.

Bolt to remove treadmill arms

Bolt to remove treadmill arms

After that, I wanted to detatch the control panel from those arms and it’s also a good time to disable that annoying speaker.  There were just a few screws holding the panel together, so I went ahead and unscrewed those to access the board and speaker.

Treadmill control panel

Treadmill control panel

Treadmill control panel, cover off

Treadmill control panel, cover off

It looked like the power wire came in through the bottom and just plugs into the circuit board. There was a little bit of what seemed to be rubber cement holding mine in, but a careful tug and it came right out. (Be careful at this step! The female side of the power connection may be delicate) There was also this little bridge thing that was perhaps unintentially holding the wire.I had to unscrew that “bridge” as well. In any case, just take out every screw you can find, you’ll have to do it eventually anyways to take out the circuit board to get to the backside. I took out the circuit board and highlighted the speaker in the image below.

Treadmill speaker location on circuit board

Treadmill speaker location on circuit board

That speaker is so annoyingly loud, and if it were to go off every half hour (since the treadmill spots automatically in 30 minute intervals), it would definitely be annoying to apartment neighbors or roommates. Let’s destroy it, shall we? Here’s (below) the back side of the circuit board. One end of speaker comes in from the important stuff (highlighted in the image) and the other end looks like it just goes to ground.

UPDATE: My treadmill just recently kicked the bucket after 1.6 years of fairly heavy use, which is pretty good if you asked me! I’m buying another one actually of the same model, but I’m getting a SquareTrade 3-Year Fitness Protection Plan to go along with it. I think it’s a good deal, since they probably won’t expect someone to use this treadmill as much as we probably are, so we’ll come out ahead since they didn’t calculate that into their price! Anyway, I bring this up because the following step does physical damage to the treadmill and may void the warranty. I’m looking into alternative methods of silencing the speaker that won’t leave physical evidence of tampering. I believe one of the visitors mentioned that you can drop a glob of superglue into the speaker opening and that stops the speaker from annoying everyone. This sounds like it’s probably the least destructive method. You could potentially use a screwdriver to “pry” the speaker just slightly off the board until the circuit breaks as well, that might be the least detectable method, but I think I’m going to try the superglue myself.

Backside of treadmill speaker location on circuit board

Backside of treadmill speaker location on circuit board

Okay, that’s easy then. Let’s just take a knife and cut away the input to the speaker. Here’s a macro shot of the carnage after I’ve had at it with my knife. Keep in mind the image above is rotated from the image below.

Cutting the speaker connection

Cutting the speaker connection

Perfect! Now that stupid speaker is silenced. I screwed the circuit board back into the plastic casings and then threaded the power cable back into the arms and pulled it out the other end. Easy.

Threading power plug back through arms

Threading power plug back through arms

I then removed the arms, stepped back and took a picture of what seems to be a pretty ideal treadmill for a standing desk.

Final flat treadmill without arms

Final flat treadmill without arms

I worry a little bit about the front end of the treadmill since it’s no longer being supported by the metal bars on the side, but rather by the plastic casing that’s protecting the motor. If that bothers you, you could reattach the bars and have at it with a saw, but so far it seems to be able to handle my weight. I weighed about 172lbs when I started using it, so perhaps you won’t need to reinforce it, or perhaps you should reinforce it before you even try it out (if you weigh significantly more). It’s your call. I dragged this thing under my standing desk (after raising it a little bit to accommodate), turned it on (there was NO more annoying beeping sound), and started typing this post.

My final treadmill desk setup

My final treadmill desk setup

UPDATE: I added a towel to the back of the treadmill to help level it out. It was at a slight incline before and this helps it feel much more natural.

Towel used to level the treadmill

Towel used to level the treadmill

Overall, for the $290 dollars I paid for this desk and treadmill, I believe it was well worth it. Hopefully this Confidence Power Plus Motorized Treadmill won’t die on me tomorrow, but it seems to be doing well so far.

Here are the measured dimensions of the Confidence Power Plus Motorized Electric Treadmill with bars removed, made approximately level by folding up a towel and placing it at the back end to prop it up.

I also just wrote up some instructions on how to disable that annoying 30 minute timer. Head on over here to see: Disabling The Confidence Treadmill Timer

Length: 4 feet long, or 3 feet 11 inches if you cram the power cable that comes out up against a wall.

Width of treadmill: 20 inches.

Width of only the walking surface: 14 inches.

Height of the walking surface above the ground (with bars removed): 4 inches

Height of the motor casing at the front end: 6 inches.

Dimensions of the control panel: 6 inches by 8 inches

UPDATE: Half a year in and the treadmill still works great! (I had to lube it up once to stop the squeaking sound, but it went away soon after that maintenance.) I feel that the negative amazon reviews are a bit unjustified, or are reviewed with the idea that you can run on this treadmill. (You cannot. Walking is okay, but if you want to run, you will break it in no time.)

FINAL UPDATE: Well, my treadmill died after about 1.6 years of VERY heavy use. Not bad for a cheap treadmill. I think I’m going to upgrade to something more substantial like the LifeSpan TR1200-DT5 Treadmill Desk. A word of caution about the Confidence Power Plus Treadmill, when it failed, it suddenly switched and got stuck on its highest speed. The warning signs were the speed setting becoming less accurate (getting slower) and you get a burning smell that occurs after hours of use. Luckily, the years of training my body to not walk into my desk when it stops every half hour helped me not fall off. I guess that’s the cost of being poor. :( But I can probably afford the lifespan treadmill now thanks to all the donations!!

Also, don’t forget maintenance. It’s about that time for mine, so I wrote a little post including the manufacturer’s instructions. 


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