Disabling The Confidence Treadmill Timer

The most annoying “feature” of the Confidence Power Plus Treadmillis that it has a built in timer that stops the treadmill at 30 minute intervals. But with the help of a wonderful visitor to this site, I have the pleasure of posting a potential solution to this problem! This solution was given by Chip (Not sure if he wants his full name on my site). But thanks Chip! I haven’t had a chance to try this out myself, so as always, make sure things make sense to you first and be cautious!

Potential solution #1:

Items needed:

-1M Ohm Potentiometer. This potentiometer acts like a “volume controller” and will control the speed up and down.

-Project Box 5-1/4″ x 3-1/4″ You’ll need some kind of project box. I think smaller ones will work, but the larger ones will give you more space and may make it easier to build.

-Wire cutter/stripper/crimping tool

-Electrical Tape

-About 5 feet of 18 gauge wire used for thermostats. Get the one with three wires. See below, you might decide that you do not need it.

-Drill and 5/16” bits for the project box, smaller bit if you want to connect to your desk with cable ties.

-Cable ties or other means to mount the box to your standing desk.

-Needle nosed pliers.

Optional, but useful!

-Electrical outlet with remote control shutoff. Woods 32555 Outdoor Remote Control Outlet Converter Kit

– 2 Fans like the Honeywell TurboForce Fan, HT-900, one for the treadmill, one for the walker.

Again, the following are instructions donated by a visitor, so I haven’t tried this myself yet. If anyone tries this and has issues getting it to work, please let me know and I’ll add some warnings/cautions wherever needed. I turn it over to Chip!

Prepping the wires

I wanted to have my potentiometer where I could reach it. So I needed to extend the cord of the controller a little bit.

1. Unplug the treadmill from the electrical outlet.

2. Using scissors or a wire cutter, cut off the controller near the controller itself. No need to remove the cover and unplug it, because you will not need the extra couple of inches it will get you. Set the controller aside—you will not use it anymore at all.

3. Strip a little of the black covering back, about 1.5”, to expose the three internal wires (Red, Green, and Black.)

4. Using the wire stripper on the 22 gauge setting, strip about ¼” of the colored covering from each wire.

5. The wires inside are stranded, so twist the exposed strands of each color with your fingers to make each a tight unit.

Extending the length

If you do not care if you can reach the potentiometer (and in reality you will probably not change it much), you can skip steps 6-17.

6. Cut away about 2” of the outer covering of the thermostat wire.

7. Using the wire stripper on the 18 gauge setting, strip about ½” of the colored covering from each wire. Mine were Red, Green, and White. Do each end.

8. Using red butt splicers, put one of the twisted wires from the treadmill into the splicer, put the butt splicer between the red dotted part of the crimping tool, and crimp down to seal it in. Tug gently to make sure it stays.

9. Repeat for each color of the wire.

10. Insert the red thermostat wire in the opposite end of the butt splicer that you connected to the red treadmill wire. Use the red dotted part of the crimping tool and crimp down to seal it in. Repeat this, connecting green to green, and white to black.

Note, the thermostat wire is solid copper and not as flexible as the stranded wire from the treadmill controller. This is why I cut back a couple of inches of the outer insulation, so that I could manipulate the wire more easily.

You now have a longer cable coming from the treadmill. We’ll tape it up later, after we’re sure all the connections are good. I did not want to solder so I used clips to connect the extended cable to the pot. But before doing that, I made sure the connections I made with the butt splices were good. Here’s how:

11. Connecting the potentiometer temporarily: Using the pliers, bend the exposed ends of each thermostat wire to make “hooks” for temporary connection.

12. Hold the pot with the dial facing up and the clips toward you.

13. Hook each wire over the appropriate pot connector: left to right, hook up red, green, and white.

14. Turn the dial all the way down, and then up slightly.

15. Plug the treadmill in and turn it on. If the wires are making good connections, the treadmill should run slowly. Make sure the “hooks” are making good contact by pulling down on the thermostat wire. Turn the dial to make sure it’s up enough to make the treadmill run. If the above works, disconnect the treadmill from the power again.

16. Straighten the “hooks” with the pliers

Connecting the potentiometer (aka “pot”)

17. On the end of each colored wire, put a red spade clip and crimp it using the red dotted part of the crimping tool.

a. Using the pliers, gently close the gap in the spade clips a little so that they will be tight on the pot connectors.

18. Hold the pot with the dial facing up and the clips toward you.

19. Slide each clip onto the appropriate pot connector: left to right, hook up red, green, and black (or white if you extended the cable).

a. Make sure the clips do not touch each other. They only cover part of the pot clips, so put the red and black/white connectors so that they are to the “outside” and the middle one on either side of the clip.

20. Testing: Turn the dial all the way down, and then up slightly.

21. Plug the treadmill in and turn it on. If the wires are making good connections, the treadmill should run slowly. Turn the dial to make sure it’s up enough to make the treadmill run.

22. If the above works, disconnect the treadmill from the power again. If it does not work, snip off the connectors and try again.

Congratulations! Your dial works. Now we want to neaten it up and install it into something that will keep the connections stable.

The RadioShack project box comes with no holes in it. We need a hole for the wires to enter and for the dial part of the pot to stick out.

23. Drill a 5/16” hole in the bottom of the box for the wires to come in.

24. Drill a hole in the side to for the dial to protrude through. The location of this is critical because it needs to allow the pot to sit flush with the wall inside. Watch for the channels and make sure your hole is centered left to right.

25. If you want to connect it to your desk with a cable tie, drill a hole that will fit a cable tie in each side of the box.

26. Run the wire and connectors and into the bottom hole and tie a knot in the cable that will keep it stationary inside the box.

a. My project box was so small that this was hard to do and still manipulate the wiring clips, so I left out the knot and used an additional cable tie to secure the cable from being pulled.

27. Put the pot through the hole you drilled for that and secure with the nut and washer.

28. Connect the clips to the correct pot terminals. (red, green, black/white)

29. Test as in step 21-22

30. Close up the project box with the screws provided and connect to the desk if desired.

31. Finally, if you used steps 10-22, gently wrap the spliced wires with the electrical tape.

Connect the power and you’re in business. Turn on the power switch and adjust to your desired speed.

You now turn the treadmill on and off with the power switch, which is kind of inconvenient. If you buy the optional power cord with remote control, you can plug it into the wall and then to your treadmill power. Turn on the treadmill power and then you can use the remote to turn it on and off. This is useful so that when people come in my office for a meeting, I don’t have to stoop down and shut off the treadmill. And if I want to head out for a coffee refill, I can stop it easily and restart it when I return. Using a power strip, I plugged in both my treadmill and one of my fans that cools the motor.

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